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Lee DiPrinzio: Keep Your Floor-Plan Options (Partially) Open

  • November 14, 2017 3:11 PM
    Message # 5586269
    Angie Ellis (Administrator)

    No issue generates more discussion in our industry than the architectural Pandora’s box: an open floor plan. 

    In cities like Philadelphia, the workforce now skews younger; millennials tend to favor collaborative work environments. An open floor plan doesn’t intimidate them—they’re used to team cultures from their college years onward. 

    However, wide-open spaces aren’t necessarily productive ones for an older generation that cherishes the privacy of four solid walls and a door. Per a 2017 Forbes Coaches’ Council blog post, the pros and cons of an open floor plan are subjectively debatable.
    It can simultaneously: 

    • Disrupt deep work
    • Offer a 360-degree viewpoint
    • Drain introverts
    • Foster inclusion and communication

    An approach to open floor plans coincides with a crucial point in the article: it depends on your culture and line of work. If your company encourages constant collaboration as part of the workflow process, a hybrid open floor plan is a good idea. That’s because: you’ll still need secure spaces for confidential meetings. (We’ve NEVER seen a completely open floor plan!) Industries most conducive to a modified open floor plan include: Continue reading....


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